Tag Archives: prairie

The Old jail, cottonwood falls, Kansas

rectangles and squares formed by metal slats in the old jail in Cottonwood Falls, Kansas
Heavy metal slats are riveted together to form a grid of squares and rectangles in the old jail of the Chase County Courthouse in Cottonwood Falls, Kansas.

Tucked inside the beautiful Chase County Courthouse in Cottonwood Falls, Kansas, you’ll find the nastiest, roughest little jail you’ve ever seen. It seems like one night here would be enough to set anyone on the straight and narrow. Still, judging from the names repeatedly scrawled on the walls, there were several inmates who just couldn’t stay away.

Unlike other old jails I’ve seen where cells are enclosed by bars, the cells here are made from crossed slats of heavy metal. They form a pattern of rectangles and squares that creates a dreary feeling, impenetrable and unforgiving. Nonetheless, it’s fun to see if you’re only there for a visit. You get there through the jury room adjacent to the imposing courtroom.

With its red mansard roof, the Chase County courthouse is a Kansas landmark

The ugliness of the jail contrasts with the beauty of the rest of the building which was built in the French Renaissance style. Completed in 1873 the Chase County Courthouse is the older Kansas courthouse still in use. It’s constructed constructed of walnut and limestone, topped with a red mansard roof that stands high over this Flint Hills prairie town.

The courthouse is characterized by the distinctive shape of the roof.  Standing 113-feet tall, you can see the courthouse and its red mansard roof from vantage points throughout the county on most days. 

While you’re at the courthouse, be sure to look for more shapes in the architecture.

Look up from the bottom of the spiral staircase Chase County courthouse
more shapes to see in the staircase at the chase county courthouse
Looking down from the third floor of the Chase County courthouse

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Weekly Photo Challenge: In the Background, South Dakota

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Hiking with the Nature Conservancy in the Samuel H. Ordway Memorial Preserve in South Dakota

On the prairie, the background is the story. More than most other places, the vast grasslands of the Dakotas make us stop and look for a moment at open spaces and realize that they are far from empty.

Gretel Ehrlich says in The Solace of Open Spaces, “We Americans are great on fillers, as if what we have, what we are, is not enough. We have a cultural tendency toward denial, but being affluent, we strangle ourselves with what we can buy. We gave only to look at the houses we build to see how we build “against” space, the way we drink against pain and loneliness. We fill up space as if it were a pie shell, with things whose opacity further obstructs our ability to see what is already there.”

Buffalo, Butterflies and Oceans of Grass on the South Dakota Prairie

The vast sky and grassland of the South Dakota Prairie

When driving “out west,” as people in my half of the country call it, the prairie is the part of the trip to be gotten through before you get to the good stuff, the mountains and national parks of the west.  Yet on a recent trip to the prairie of South Dakota, I realized that the vast ocean of grass that stretch as far as the eye can see is a fascinating destination in itself.

The grassland supports delicate butterflies....

...colorful flowers....

We went on a tour of the Nature Conservancy’s  Samuel Ordway Prairie Preserve.  Aberdeen is the closest town, if you don’t count the really tiny farm communities in between.  When the prairie was my destination, not something to be barreled through on my way somewhere else, I began to really look and found that the amazing grassland is teaming with wildlife, from tiny frogs and butterflies to birds and enormous buffalo, if you take the time to look at it. Actually, it’s hard to miss the buffalo.

... and enormous buffalo.

To people who are used to city or suburban life simply to be in such a vast uninhabited grassland is amazing.  In her memoir, Dakota: A Spiritual Geography, Kathleen Norris talks about a friend who asked her what there is to see there.  She responds, “Nothing.”  And that’s precisely the point.  So much open space—no telephone poles, buildings or trees and no people—is something rarely seen. It also struck how different one’s perspective on life would be, politically and otherwise, if you lived in such an area rather than a city.

On this 7,800-acre preserve, the Nature Conservancy staff manages a bison herd and conducts research on the plants and animals of this ecosystem, especially in relation to invasive exotic species.  However, I was most fascinated with the land itself and the size of the sky.  It would take a much tougher person than I am to live in this expanse, especially in winter.

So, on your way to the Black Hills, Mt. Rushmore, the Badlands, and on to Yellowstone or other parks, take a look at the prairie, too.  If you’re going, I recommend reading Dan O’Brien’s Buffalo for the Broken Heart: Restoring Life to a Black Hills Ranch, Dan Laskin’s The Children’s Blizzard, and O.E. Rolvag’s classic about prairie pioneers, Giants in the Earth.