Category Archives: Photography

Naniboujou Lodge- An Amazing Detour or Destination

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The dining room at Naniboujou Lodge on Minnesota’s north shore of Lake Superior.

I’ve been waiting for a chance to post something about Naniboujou Lodge, just north of Grand Marais on Minnesota’s North Shore.  This photo challenge, Ooh, Shiny!Diversions, distractions, and delightful detours offers the perfect opportunity.

Naniboujou is the Cree god for the outdoors.  In 1929, this lodge was planned to be an exclusive getaway for Chicago celebs and outdoorsmen.  It was a great idea, but the Great Depression brought that to an end.  In smaller form than originally planned, this historic lodge on Lake Superior continues on– and the best part is this stunningly-painted dining room.  The food is great, but the ceiling (this is the original paint) is mind-blowing.   It’s a delightful distraction and worth a detour if you’re on your way along the north shore between Grand Marais and Canada or ready to set out on the Gunflint Trail.

 

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KiMo Theater, Albuquerque, New Mexico

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KiMo Theater in Albuquerque, New Mexico

The KiMo Theater opened on what was then Route 66 (now Central Avenue) in Albuquerque in 1927.   The big new theater was a source of civic pride and boosters held a contest to name the theater. The governor of Isleta Pueblo,  Pablo Abeita, won a prize of $50, a huge sum for the time, for the KiMo name. According to theater history, “it is a combination of  two Tiwa words meaning “mountain lion” but liberally interpreted as ‘king of its kind’.”

It certainly is king of its kind, built in the the “pueblo deco” architectural style. If you think the outside is interesting, you should see the decor on the inside.  Understated it is not. Here are a few scenes from the interior.

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Nostalgia: Detroit

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The taste of Fargo pop–yes, we call it “pop”– is one of my childhood memories, especially Rock & Rye.

I love Detroit.

If you haven’t been there lately, that may sound pretty crazy.  There’s been no shortage of reporting on Detroit’s hard times.  But I grew up near “the D” and as a kid, a trip to Detroit meant something special–a Detroit Tigers game or a speedboat race on the Detroit River with my dad, shopping at Hudson’s with my mom, Broadway shows at the Fisher Theater, field trips to the Detroit Institute of Arts, all accompanied by the rhythm of Motown.

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A portion of the famous murals by Diego Rivera at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

I live in Minnesota now, but returned to the city last week and once again felt how special it is–its history, it’s people, and a general vibe of grit and coolness found in few other places. Best of all, many of the things from my memory are still there, though sometimes in altered form.

Partly because of those qualities, the city is making a huge comeback.  I was there for five days and could have stayed longer, partly enjoying the memories, partly seeing what’s vital and new, and feeling nostalgia with a positive spin.

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The Detroit riverfront has changed dramatically, with old industrial land converted to parks. Windsor, Canada, is on the opposite shore.

 

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Travel Photography: Portraits

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Here’s a young guy I met at the Walker Art Center Sculpture Garden in Minneapolis.  Love all those rings.

While I’m on the topic of travel photography….Portraits–don’t even get me going on what a challenge I have getting good portraits of people I meet while traveling. Yet, there’s nothing more interesting than faces. Portraits are worth the effort because photography lacks a greater sense of place without them. Sure there are beautiful landscapes, artistic still lifes—food!—and some fun shots of people from a distance but those close-up photos of faces are what really tell a story and give an impression of the folks who inhabit any place—from Minneapolis to Morocco.

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A resident of the Acoma Pueblo, “Sky City” in New Mexico.  This face tells a thousand Native American stories.
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The concentration on Chuck Berry’s face shows what a challenge it was for the aging rock n’ roller to play his famous tunes.

I’m kind of chicken. It’s hard to get right up close to people you don’t know, but that’s what it takes for a good portrait. Up close, the subject may become more stiff and self-conscious so sometimes I take the photo from a distance, maybe when they’re not looking, and just crop the heck out of it later. If I’m lucky it won’t be blurry.  Ultimately, it just takes a few extra seconds–and a little bravery–to get a better shot.

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Not the best portrait, but I want everyone to know I really was this close to Girard Butler.

Also, there’s the etiquette and ethics of portraiture. I’m getting better, but it’s a challenge to ask people that may not speak my language if I can take their picture. Some people just hate to have their picture taken, sometimes for religious reasons. Often, the more exotic looking (or sometimes the more downtrodden looking) the person, the more dramatic the photo.  Am I taking advantage of them or invading their privacy? In Morocco, I was told not to pay children for their pictures because it encourages them to forego school for money-making photo opps.

 

One way I’ve found to get good portraits is to buy something the person is selling or simply put a few coins in a street entertainer’s music case. And, if my potential photo subject is in business, like a bartender or shopkeeper, they’re usually happy to cooperate.

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The folks at Lake Drum Brewing in Geneva, New York, were happy to show off their bar and their beer.
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The owner at Prison Brews in Jefferson City, a delightful brewpub right next door to the infamous Missouri State Penitentiary.
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I always question how much of a person’s environment to show….

 

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…more or less? as with the case with Giuseppe, an artist from whom I purchased a little Leaning Tower painting in Pisa, Italy.

When all else fails, animals are usually very eager to pose for a portrait, no questions asked.

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A noble hound at Chateau Cheverny in France.

 

Travel Photos- Composition Comes First

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Colorful pottery in Sienna, Italy.

I’ve been traveling a lot lately and have many stories and pictures to share since I last posted.  I’ve had adventures in quite varied places including the backroads of Missouri on the Katy Bike Trail, around central Italy, and a few spots right here in Minneapolis (more on those soon).  Every time I return from a trip, I pour over my photos, delete the junk, crop and perfect the good pics and relive my experiences in the process.

I use these photos in my blog and sell them as part of article packages or slide shows, but I take pictures on the fly, more like a tourist than a professional photographer who camps out for several days to get the best light.  I’m too small to lug all that equipment–several cameras, lenses and a tripod and more.  Plus, I’d rather pay attention to the experience than gadgetry.

That’s why I try to keep a few basic ideas in mind to elevate my photos several notches above “snapshot.”  Sherry Ott, a photographer and travel writer who as far as I can tell is completely nomadic, which fascinates me, just posted a great summary of what to keep in mind while taking pictures as a traveler. On her blog, Ottsworld, she says, it’s not about the equipment, its about composition.  In fact, many of the travel writers I know take great pictures with their iPhones, though I have to say a good digital SLR makes a difference.

I’m sharing a link from her blog, my fellow travelers, for your own use and inspiration: How to Take Better Vacation Pictures.  No matter what your skill level, her tips are a great reminder that it just takes a little extra thought to compose more satisfying photos.

And please share any tips you have with the rest of us by commenting here.

Curves of Chihuly Glass

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Butterfly and Chihuly at Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Columbus, Ohio.

This is a lucky butterfly, settling in the midst of the curves of a work by renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly.  I spotted her at the Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Columbus Ohio.

With blooms busting’ out all over, this botanical garden is beautiful from the start.  Then add a butterfly garden with installations of Chihuly Glass.  The curving, colorful forms of glass serve to draw attention to the curves and colors of nature that surround them, heightening  our awareness of nature’s amazing artistry.

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This is the artwork in its entirety.

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